Riding in Laughs :)

  • William: You havin fun yet?
  • renee: yes, doing bike stuff
  • William: Bikes are lame
  • William: You ever heard of a horse?
  • William: That's the OG wheels,meng!
Reblogged from The Green Urbanist.
Al Roker reminding all LIRR riders at the Mastic-Shirley station to mind the gap!
(Photo Credit: Tim Pendrell)

Al Roker reminding all LIRR riders at the Mastic-Shirley station to mind the gap!


(Photo Credit: Tim Pendrell)

seismogenic:

I had a lot of fun parodying the Muni centennial logo, and since a certain other major landmark has a major anniversary this year as well, it seemed only fair that her logo get a similar treatment.
The actual Golden Gate Bridge 75 logo is © the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway, and Transportation District, and the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. Here’s more information about the celebrations that are planned for the anniversary!

seismogenic:

I had a lot of fun parodying the Muni centennial logo, and since a certain other major landmark has a major anniversary this year as well, it seemed only fair that her logo get a similar treatment.

The actual Golden Gate Bridge 75 logo is © the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway, and Transportation District, and the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. Here’s more information about the celebrations that are planned for the anniversary!

A hero shop in Downtown Brooklyn uses the familiar NYC Subway map to navigate us through our needs, desires and to a yummy sandwich.
Photo credit: author.

A hero shop in Downtown Brooklyn uses the familiar NYC Subway map to navigate us through our needs, desires and to a yummy sandwich.

Photo credit: author.

bikecrushdc:

welcome to the bike share family, Boston! 

bikecrushdc:

welcome to the bike share family, Boston

Reblogged from The Green Urbanist.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stands in front of a bus at the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama (December 26, 1956). 
The boycott was a political and social protest against racial segregation on Montgomery’s public transportation system.  At the time, white people who boarded the bus took seats in the front rows and black people took seats in the back rows. If the bus was full and another  white person boarded the bus, then the black passengers closest to the front had to offer their seat. Often when boarding the buses, black people were required to pay at the front, get off, and reenter the bus through a separate door at the back. On some occasions bus drivers would drive away before black passengers were able to re-board.
Today (4/4/12) is the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination in Memphis, Tennessee.Please take a moment on your bus or train ride home to remember his and other civil right leaders fight to make America’s public transit systems equally accessible to all. 
Photo credit: The History Channel (History.com)

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stands in front of a bus at the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama (December 26, 1956).

The boycott was a political and social protest against racial segregation on Montgomery’s public transportation system.  At the time, white people who boarded the bus took seats in the front rows and black people took seats in the back rows. If the bus was full and another  white person boarded the bus, then the black passengers closest to the front had to offer their seat. Often when boarding the buses, black people were required to pay at the front, get off, and reenter the bus through a separate door at the back. On some occasions bus drivers would drive away before black passengers were able to re-board.

Today (4/4/12) is the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination in Memphis, Tennessee.Please take a moment on your bus or train ride home to remember his and other civil right leaders fight to make America’s public transit systems equally accessible to all. 

Photo credit: The History Channel (History.com)

Via Jess Zimmerman, editor for Grist List:
The extraordinary Humans of New York has put this avid cycling fan in the spotlight today:

“My story? Well I’m 90 years old and I ride this thing around everywhere. I don’t see why more people don’t use them. I carry my cane in the basket, I get all my shopping done, I can go everywhere. I’ve never hit anyone and never been hit. Of course, I ride on the sidewalk, which I don’t think I’m supposed to do, but still…”

Via Jess Zimmerman, editor for Grist List:

The extraordinary Humans of New York has put this avid cycling fan in the spotlight today:

“My story? Well I’m 90 years old and I ride this thing around everywhere. I don’t see why more people don’t use them. I carry my cane in the basket, I get all my shopping done, I can go everywhere. I’ve never hit anyone and never been hit. Of course, I ride on the sidewalk, which I don’t think I’m supposed to do, but still…”